Using I’m a Scientist to increase participation in higher education

“Traditionally, not many of our students go on to university. I’m a Scientist helps by allowing students to relate to scientists and helping them see the value of studying at a higher level.” – Mark McNally, Science Teacher

 


A mixed 2-19 academy, where over two thirds of the school population are students from disadvantaged backgrounds, took part in I’m a Scientist in March 2018. Mark tells us how the activity helped interest his students in science careers and consider higher education.

Why apply for I’m a Scientist?

Despite a good attitude to learning among the students, not many go on to higher education; something the school is working to improve. Mark explains how he wanted to challenge his students’ preconceptions of scientists and help them consider studying science at a higher level; “I wanted to show our students science is not just for ‘weird people with crazy hair and lab coats’ and help them find interest in things going on now in science to increase the chance of them pursuing STEM subjects in the future.”

What did the students do?

The activity was covered in three lessons led by the class teacher across a two week period. Students started by considering how to judge the competing scientists, then got to know them using their profiles and asking questions on the site. The final lesson involved an online chat where students typed their questions and responses to scientists in real time before voting for their favourite scientist.

Did it work?

Mark agrees that I’m a Scientist helps raise students’ science capital, increasing the likelihood of them studying STEM subjects or using science in their future professions. “Raising awareness of a variety of careers they can go into and getting them in contact with scientists helps students see it’s something they could do.”

Opening students’ minds to higher education

I’m a Scientist provided an opportunity for Mark’s students to engage with science professionals who have studied at a high level, helping to open students’ minds to options they may not have otherwise considered. “I think one of the main barriers for our students is that not many come from families with an academic background so they don’t often consider academic routes,” explains Mark, “through this activity, my students connected with academic people and found out about things that interest them in terms of a future career, so they are more likely to pursue an academic route.”

”Even if students don’t want a career in STEM, they can now see the value of studying at a higher level and if they do want a career in STEM, this activity helped cement that for them.”

Satisfying quieter students’ curiosity

Mark’s students developed knowledge and understanding on current scientific topics, “I’m a Scientist allowed the students to engage with the kind of science that’s going on right now in the world.” Mark also told us of the importance for his students to be able to ask whatever they liked throughout the activity, “for a lot of students, I’m a Scientist was about satisfying their curiosity. It’s important because they have so many questions and they don’t always ask, especially the quieter students, but using this platform allows them to get their questions addressed.”


To support your students in considering higher education through I’m a Scientist activities, register your interest here: imascientist.org.uk/teachers or contact admin@imascientist.org.uk for more information.

Already registered? Don’t forget to apply for the next event – we email registered teachers when applications open (about 2 months before the event starts).

Posted on May 2, 2018 by modkatie in Case Study, Evaluation, News, Teachers, Widening Participation. Comments Off on Using I’m a Scientist to increase participation in higher education